SolarLEAP: solar powered computers for the digital divide -- Image Gallery

Image Gallery

To date, SolarLEAP as an organization has built over forty computers using our uniquely designed power-efficient 17.3" widescreen monitor design. Before the organization was founded, however, SolarLEAP founder Charles Watson worked for a year in Nepal and Ghana, distributing more than sixty computers. This image gallery contains photos detailing SolarLEAP's work as an organization, in addition to Charles' work prior to founding the company.

To see more information about each photo, click the white i icon at the top left of the gallery.

Kathmandu, Nepal<br>Students gather around a table to see the computers. This photo was taken at the first installation of computers on Charles Watson's gap year, in an orphanage in Kathmandu. Nangi, Nepal<br>Two donated CRT monitors in a school in rural Nepal. Due to their high power consumption, they won't even turn on: the grid cannot handle such a high load. Nangi, Nepal<br>The same wiring could support more than ten SolarLEAP computers. The school received three units plus a battery backup system that would ensure the computers kept running after the power went off. Nangi, Nepal<br>These computers ran Windows 7, which the teachers were more familiar with than Ubuntu. Nangi, Nepal<br>After the installation, we got straight to work using the computers, spending the rest of the day on a computer workshop. Nangi, Nepal<br>After the installation, we got straight to work using the computers, spending the rest of the day on a computer workshop. Nangi, Nepal<br>Teachers return home after teaching. Nangi, Nepal<br>The lodge where I stayed for the week had electricity (when the power grid was up). Kaphal Danda, Nepal<br>The school committee invited me to a ceremony after the donation of computers to the school. Kathmandu, Nepal<br>An installation of computers in an inner-city school in Kathmandu was very appreciated by the students... Kathmandu, Nepal<br>...the fact that the computers would remain on when the lights went out, even more so! Kathmandu, Nepal<br>A student uses a SolarLEAP computer during a power outage. Between Denu and Dzodze, Ghana<br>Waiting for a bus on the side of the road in the 45-degree weather. The bag to my right contained three computers and all necessary supplies. Kasu, Ghana<br>Students watch from the ground as we installed the solar panel on the roof. Kasu, Ghana<br>The computer teacher at the Kasu Basic School had a lot of prior experience with computers, but the school he taught at had no computers available. Before the SolarLEAP computer lab was installed, he had to teach computer classes abstractly, by reading from a textbook and making 'double click' gestures in the air. Kpelikorpe, Ghana<br>Students of the Kpelikorpe Basic School pose for a photograph with their new computers. Kuli, Ghana<br>A student practices touch typing using the KTouch software on Ubuntu. Kasu, Ghana<br>Students using the computers. Kasu, Ghana<br>Students using the computers. Kasu, Ghana<br>Students use the computers during class. The seven-computer lab serves more than 200 students. Canumay, Philippines<br>The Canumay village is home of the closest school to Manila that does not have electricity. Canumay, Philippines<br>A 300W solar array on the roof serves ten computers plus internet access to the school. Canumay, Philippines<br>A 300W solar array on the roof serves ten computers plus internet access to the school. Canumay, Philippines<br>A teacher watches trigonometry lessons on SolarLEAP's digital library. Canumay, Philippines<br>Students using the computer lab during class. Canumay, Philippines<br>A student reads about Van Gogh's 'Starry Night' on the offline Wikipeda section of the digital library. While this school had internet access, each computer has offline access to hundreds of gigabytes of educational material. Canumay, Philippines<br>Teachers pose with SolarLEAP's current desktop computer design. The teachers had a lesson in disassembling and putting together a computer again, should any hardware problems arise, they will be able to fix them. Canumay, Philippines<br>Five of the ten SolarLEAP monitors in the school's computer lab. The screens feature a 17.3 inch widescreen LG panel. The Solar Energy Foundation technician stands on the roof of the Gum Selasa Elementary School in the Tigray region of Ethiopia. The Gum Selasa installation was by far our cleanest and most reliable installation so far. All fifteen computers in the school ran off circuit breakers for maximum reliability. All fifteen computers running off of battery power for final testing the night before the official opening ceremony at the Gum Selasa Elementary School. An Ethiopian Television Reporter works with a student at the official opening ceremony.